Tuesday’s campaign round-up

TUESDAY’S CAMPAIGN ROUND-UP….Today’s installment of campaign-related news items that wouldn’t generate a post of their own, but may be of interest to political observers.

* In 2005, when Creigh Deeds (D) and Bob McDonnell (R) faced off in Virginia’s attorney general race, the National Rifle Association backed Deeds. In 2009, the NRA has switched and has thrown its support to McDonnell.

* The latest Research 2000 poll for Daily Kos in Arkansas shows incumbent Sen. Blanche Lincoln (D) below the 50% threshold, but nevertheless leading her GOP challengers in hypothetical general election match-ups. The margins ranged from a seven-point lead to a 19-point lead. It’s early, and Lincoln is obviously vulnerable, but the results are better for the Democrat than expected.

* Research 2000 also polled Connecticut, and found incumbent Sen. Chris Dodd (D) trailing former Rep. Rob Simmons (R) by four, 46% to 42%. That margin is far smaller than a recent Rasmussen poll that showed Simmons up by 10.

* Former Rep. Rick Lazio (R-N.Y.), soundly defeated by Hillary Clinton in a Senate race in 2000, has decided to run for governor next year.

* Speaking of New York, contrary to some reports, Rudy Giuliani is not running for the Senate next year.

* Former President Bill Clinton will wade into California’s Democratic gubernatorial primary, and throw his support to San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom. Most polls show Newsom trailing state Attorney General Jerry Brown by a wide margin, though Clinton’s endorsement may shake up the race.

* In Massachusetts’ upcoming special election to fill Ted Kennedy’s vacancy, City Year co-founder Alan Khazei has announced he’ll compete in the Democratic primary. Steve Pagliuca, a managing director at Bain Capital and managing partner of the Boston Celtics, is also eyeing the race.

* And in Michigan, retired football player Jay Riemersma announced yesterday that he’s running to replace Rep. Peter Hoekstra (R), who’s running for governor. Riemersma has never held public office, but has worked at the right-wing Family Research Council since hanging up his cleats. Shortly before Election Day last year, Riemersma wrote a piece called, “How could Christians vote for Obama?”