Nike latest to reject USCOC on climate change

NIKE LATEST TO REJECT USCOC ON CLIMATE CHANGE…. Following up on an item from yesterday, it appears that the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s conservative line on global warming isn’t done alienating its one-time supporters.

Nike will relinquish its spot on the board of directors at the Chamber of Commerce to protest the business lobby’s opposition to climate-change legislation.

“We believe that on the issue of climate change the Chamber has not represented the diversity of perspective held by the board of directors,” the company says in a statement obtained by POLITICO. “Therefore, we have decided to resign our board of directors position.”

Nike has long been a strong advocate for government action to combat global warming and has said it “fundamentally disagrees” with the Chamber’s position on the climate bill. The company helped found Business for Innovative Climate & Energy Policy, a coalition of businesses supporting congressional action to address climate and energy legislation.

The move comes on the heels of Exelon, Pacific Gas and Electric, and PNM Resources all quitting the Chamber over the group’s efforts to derail energy reform. Nike is withdrawing from the COC’s board, but will remain with the association, with the stated intention of “advocating for climate change legislation” from within the Chamber.

Either way, it’s additional evidence that the business community is hardly united on the subject of climate change, and the Chamber of Commerce’s reflexive, conservative line, premised on the rejection of scientific evidence, is proving to be unacceptable in several corporate circles.

What’s more, Amanda Terkel highlighted a strong editorial on this from the New York Times today: “The United States Chamber of Commerce’s Web site says the group supports ‘a comprehensive legislative solution’ to global warming. Yet no organization in this country has done more to undermine such legislation….. [Responsible chamber members] see a carbon-constrained world coming and want to get out ahead of the curve — not behind it like the chamber.”