Even teabaggers can suffer huckster fatigue

EVEN TEABAGGERS CAN SUFFER HUCKSTER FATIGUE…. Fox News’ Glenn Beck released a new book in May. And another book in June. His latest book came out in September. He’ll release yet another book next summer. And then there’s “The Christmas Sweater.”

Beck’s Christmas book was released last year, but it’s getting an update year — buy now and you can read the holiday story with a photo companion book.

But wait, there’s more. Folks willing to pay $20 could also see the deranged media personality act out his Christmas story in a one-man show.

Last night, Fox News host Glenn Beck premiered his new live show based on his book The Christmas Sweater, which was simulcast to hundreds of movie theaters across the country. Sponsor Fathom Events called it a “once in a lifetime event,” during which “Glenn will tell you about the real life events that inspired him to write” the book, play clips from his 2008 national tour, and “share stories of the overwhelming response he received.”

Despite heavy promotion on Beck’s radio and TV shows, and in-theater trailers, ticket sales were weak in major cities: Beck sold only 17 tickets in Boston, another 17 in New York, and just 30 in Washington, DC.

In Seattle, near Beck’s hometown, the theater sold 70 out of 415 seats.

Joseph Childers actually went to a showing, and said the production budget looked like it “topped out at 11 bucks and change…. I’ve seen small-town Christmas pageants with better production values than this thing.”

By some estimates, Beck takes in about $18 million a year, but he keeps creating new reasons to get his minions to give him more of their money. (He couldn’t even hire actors for this Christmas show?)

Steve M’s recent assessment continues to ring true: “So now we see what Glenn Beck really is: He’s basically a televangelist. A huckster. A late-night pitchman selling seminars and book/DVD/audio combo packages that will allegedly help you get rich through flipping real estate. A human-potential-movement cult leader who promises life breakthroughs in exchange for participation in costly ‘religious’ or ‘therapy’ programs.”