Thursday’s Mini-Report

THURSDAY’S MINI-REPORT…. Today’s edition of quick hits:

* Final health care vote looks set for 9:30 p.m. (ET) in the House.

* The right continues to be out of control: “An envelope filled with white powder was sent to the district office of Rep. Anthony Weiner (D-N.Y.) today, the congressman said in a statement.”

* Better news on new unemployment claims, which beat expectations, but they’re still too high.

* Looks like France and Germany have come to an agreement on aid to Greece.

* Pulling a Bunning, Sen. Tom Coburn (R-Okla.) blocks an extension of unemployment benefits.

* When you hear media reports that White House and congressional staffers are “exempt from health care bill,” know that those reports are wrong.

* Republican senators are likely to block Goodwin Liu’s nomination to the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, in part because he supports health care reform.

* Senate Republicans demand that President Obama refrain from making recess appointments. Or what?

* The policy consequences of health care repeal would be severe.

* Gingrich, naturally, thinks recent political violence is Democrats’ fault.

* James Joyner agrees that it’s time for conservative leaders to calm the base.

* Rep. Tom Perriello (D-Va.), another target of right-wing political violence, found House Minority Leader John Boehner’s (R-Ohio) admonition far too weak.

* Ann Coulter will not be going to Canada, where her brand of hate is frowned upon.

* Good piece from Josh Marshall on recent right-wing tactics:”It’s time for a truth moment for the national Republican party. Incitement matters. They have to take responsibility for what they’ve done: which is nothing less than a campaign of incitement for which they’re now unwilling to take any responsibility.”

Anything to add? Consider this an open thread.

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