California College Offers, Un-Offers Program for High Schools

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In February the San Francisco School Board decided to offer more ethnic studies courses in sity public schools. In an effort to be supportative, San Francisco State University’s dean of ethnic studies, Kenneth Monteiro offered to give ninth graders who passed courses in his department up to six San Francisco State credits. Well not so much. According to an article by Jill Tucker in the San Francisco Chronicle:

Details of a formal arrangement with the school district regarding the ethnic studies courses still needs to run through appropriate university channels, Ellen Griffin, director of university communications, said in an e-mail.

Giving San Francisco State course credit to ninth-graders “was not discussed with President (Robert) Corrigan before the school board presentation,” Griffin said. “He has never supported university credit for ninth-graders and does not feel it’s in keeping with the university mission.”

Griffin apparently declined to say what exactly it was about the ethnic studies for high school freshmen that was not in keeping with his school’s mission, which is, in part:

To create and maintain an environment for learning that promotes respect for and appreciation of scholarship, freedom, human diversity, and the cultural mosaic of the City of San Francisco and the Bay Area; to promote excellence in instruction and intellectual accomplishment.

Griffin’s concern might have been more logistic however. Early college programs are very popular across the United States. Cal State has actually had its own program, Step-to-College, for almost 25 years. Monteiro was planning to use Step-to-College to allow local high school students to take San Francisco State courses. The problem? Step-to-College is only available to high-school juniors and seniors.[Image via]

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Daniel Luzer

Daniel Luzer is the news editor at Governing Magazine and former web editor of the Washington Monthly. Find him on Twitter: @Daniel_Luzer