Friday’s Mini-Report

FRIDAY’S MINI-REPORT…. Today’s edition of quick hits:

* President Obama wants the next Supreme Court nominee confirmed in time for the October session, but some Senate Republicans are already openly speculating about filibustering a nominee they have not yet seen.

* National Review expects GOP senators to oppose the president’s nominee, regardless of who it is.

* Michael Scherer reviews some of the many names currently being bandied about for the president’s short list.

* Of the various possibilities, the right clearly prefers Merrick Garland.

* West Virginia: “Funerals began Friday for some of the 25 miners killed in a West Virginia coal mine, while rescue teams were making their fourth attempt to reach four workers still missing.”

* Green shoots: “Inventories held by wholesalers rose by a larger-than-expected amount in February while sales increased for the 11th consecutive month.”

* No link yet, but reliable sources tell me Dawn Johnsen is withdrawing as the president’s choice to head the OLC.

* Greek’s debt crisis continues to appear increasingly dire.

* An Israeli delegation was scheduled to attend President Obama’s nuclear security summit next week. Prime Minister Netanyahu, fearing talk about his undeclared nuclear arsenal, is now refusing to participate.

* The latest alleged domestic terrorist: Larry Eugene North, an east Texas man who also hates his government.

* The number of Republican officials calling for RNC Chairman Michael Steele’s ouster is growing.

* Forget Norquist’s pledge; how about the Tax Fairness Pledge?

* TS gets credit, not only for endorsing my “former half-term governor” frame, but also for making Glenn Reynolds look very foolish.

* Speaking of framing, Andrew Sabl follows up on his insightful take on how best to characterize the individual mandate in the Affordable Care Act. A good read, to be sure.

* A new academic discipline: male studies?

* And CNN’s Kyra Phillips seems to now realize it was a bad idea to air a segment with Richard Cohen on “curing” homosexuality.

Anything to add? Consider this an open thread.

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