More evidence of a DADT consensus

MORE EVIDENCE OF A DADT CONSENSUS…. The media roundtable on ABC’s “This Week” yesterday featured at least some ideological diversity. It was heartening, then, to see unanimity on the panel when the discussion turned to repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.”

Salon‘s Joan Walsh noted yesterday, after her appearance on the show, the “remarkable consensus” among the panelists, who endorsed the repeal line embraced by Colin Powell, who appeared earlier in the same program.

Matt Dowd, a former advisor to George W. Bush, seemed almost annoyed with his party’s intransigence on the issue. Noting the party’s near-unanimous opposition to ending the discriminatory policy, Dowd said, “Republican officeholders are so far out of step with this.”

Of particular interest, host Jake Tapper noted to George Will that polls show overwhelming public support for scrapping DADT — and that includes majority support among self-identified conservatives, Republicans, and evangelicals. Why, Tapper asked, would GOP policymakers continue to fight so hard to protect the status quo? Republican lawmakers, Will replied, are “not being very intelligent.”

The panel chuckled; no one disagreed; and the discussion moved on.

What I liked about the unanimity within the roundtable was not its novelty, but the opposite. The remarks and tone of the discussion made it seem as if this was hardly worth arguing about anymore. Dowd, whose son is on active duty, at one point called the debate “done.”

It reinforces the notion that DADT’s repeal is a no-brainer at the level of the American mainstream. It’s been a long time coming.