Thursday’s campaign round-up

THURSDAY’S CAMPAIGN ROUND-UP…. Today’s installment of campaign-related news items that wouldn’t generate a post of their own, but may be of interest to political observers.

* As was rumored yesterday, Bud Chiles ended his independent gubernatorial campaign in Florida today, and threw his support to state Chief Financial Officer Alex Sink (D).

* How worried is Rep. Mike Castle about his Republican Senate primary in Delaware? Castle, assumed to be the overwhelming favorite, purchased $113,000 worth of pre-primary airtime yesterday, suggesting Tea Party favorite Christine O’Donnell has the frontrunner awfully nervous.

* Sen. Barbara Boxer (D) and failed former HP CEO Carly Fiorina (R) had their first debate last night. The two don’t appear to get along especially well.

* For the first time in a long while, Democrats were awfully pleased with a Rasmussen poll yesterday. The GOP-friendly pollster found Joe Miller (R) leading Scott McAdams (D) in Alaska’s Senate race by just six points, 50% to 44%.

* In Ohio, Public Policy Polling shows former Rep. John Kasich (R) leading incumbent Gov. Ted Strickland (D), 50% to 40%. PPP also shows former Bush budget director Rob Portman (R) leading Lt. Gov. Lee Fisher (D) in this year’s Senate race, 45% to 38%.

* The Republican Governors Association was hit this week with a $2 million penalty after campaign finance violations in Texas’ 2006 gubernatorial campaign.

* As if there weren’t enough controversies surrounding Sen. David Vitter (R)*, FEC documents now show him receiving campaign donations from a woman who died last year.

* And in 2012 news, John Bolton, the Bush/Cheney administration’s controversial right-wing U.N. ambassador, continues to flirt with the idea of a presidential campaign.

*Corrected. Vitter is a Republican.

Support Nonprofit Journalism

If you enjoyed this article, consider making a donation to help us produce more like it. The Washington Monthly was founded in 1969 to tell the stories of how government really works—and how to make it work better. Fifty years later, the need for incisive analysis and new, progressive policy ideas is clearer than ever. As a nonprofit, we rely on support from readers like you.

Yes, I’ll make a donation