Wednesday’s campaign round-up

WEDNESDAY’S CAMPAIGN ROUND-UP…. Today’s installment of campaign-related news items that wouldn’t generate a post of their own, but may be of interest to political observers.

* Who won New Hampshire’s closely-watched GOP Senate primary? No one’s sure quite yet — it’s too close to call — but locals hope to have a winner by the end of the day. Former state A.G. Kelly Ayotte, with the support of the Republican Party, appears to have narrowly won.

* Rep. Mike Castle will not endorse Christine O’Donnell, who defeated him yesterday in a GOP primary, in Delaware’s U.S. Senate race.

* A survey taken last night by Public Policy Polling shows Chris Coons (D) starting the general-election phase with a 16-point lead over O’Donnell (R), 50% to 34%.

* Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) has decided not to run as a Libertarian this year, but has not yet ruled out a write-in campaign. An announcement about her future is now expected by Friday.

* Rep. Charlie Rangel (D-N.Y.) overcame a primary challenge in Harlem yesterday, defeating Adam Clayton Powell IV by a two-to-one margin, 50%, to 23%.

* In a win for progressive activism, Ann McLane Kuster defeated Katrina Swett in a New Hampshire congressional primary yesterday, in the race to replace Rep. Paul Hodes (D), who’s running for the Senate.

* Rep. Carolyn Maloney (D-N.Y.) faced a primary challenge from Wall Street veteran Reshma Saujani, but the incumbent had little trouble, winning 81% to 19%.

* In Nevada, a new Reuters/Ipsos poll shows Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D) hanging onto a two-point lead over Sharron Angle (R), 46% to 44%.

* And in Kentucky, the latest DailyKos/PPP poll shows right-wing ophthalmologist Rand Paul (R) continuing to lead state A.G. Jack Conway (D), 49% to 42%.

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