Wednesday’s Mini-Report

WEDNESDAY’S MINI-REPORT…. Today’s edition of quick hits:

* Terror threat: “Threats of a possible ‘Mumbai-style’ terror attack on Western interests in Europe are considered ‘credible’ and U.S. officials aren’t ruling out the possibility that the plot could extend to the U.S., a senior U.S. counterterrorism official told NBC News. The official, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said information about a possible plot emanating from al-Qaida-linked groups in northwest Pakistan was first picked up by U.S. intelligence several weeks ago and was believed to be aimed at targets in France, Germany or the United Kingdom.”

* It’s not much of a surprise, but the House has officially decided to punt on the tax-policy debate until after the midterms.

* Stem-cell research can continue for now: “A federal appeals courts Tuesday ruled that the federal government can continue funding human embryonic stem cell research pending the outcome of a lawsuit challenging the Obama administration’s new policies on the controversial field of science.”

* Sen. Ben Nelson (D-Neb.), a constant source of crushing disappointment, went to the far-right Heritage Foundation today to endorse the Republican line on tax breaks for millionaires and billionaires.

* In light of White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel’s imminent departure, Dave Weigel reviews why the left has never liked him.

* Good idea: “Nine retired U.S. military officers are urging that the U.S. travel ban to Cuba be lifted.”

* Sen. Tom Coburn (R-Okla.) holds up millions of dollars in aid for Haiti earthquake survivors. Seriously.

* On a related note, Coburn really will just block anything and everything: “A bill aimed at increasing enforcement of existing legislation to protect sharks was scuttled in the Senate today when Sen. Tom Coburn (R-OK), one of the chamber’s chief obstructionists, objected to a unanimous consent request by Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV).”

* Measuring what colleges do isn’t easy.

* As appointed Sen. Ted Kaufmann (D-Del.) prepares to wrap up his brief tenure, he makes it plain: “I don’t know what the answer is. I don’t know what to say about the system. The system is so awful.”

Anything to add? Consider this an open thread.