Walking is so 19th century

WALKING IS SO 19TH CENTURY…. It’s hard to identify the exact moment Dan Maes’ Republican gubernatorial campaign in Colorado reached the point of no return, but I’d argue it was early August. Maes insisted that bike paths in Denver were part of a “very well-disguised” scheme cooked up by the United Nations. He assured supporters the plot “will be exposed.”

The sentiment was obviously more than a little nutty, but it’s worth noting that conservative hostility towards bike paths is not limited to strange gubernatorial candidates. In a new piece for the Weekly Standard, Fred Barnes insists “the road to hell is paved with bike paths.” Jon Chait flagged Barnes’ unintentionally amusing conclusion:

In his tabletop speech, [Transportation Department Secretary Ray LaHood] said he and his wife take their bikes to the path along the C&O Canal and “ride as far as we possibly can.” That’s nice. But it’s interesting, and perhaps telling, that the canal, as a major mode of transportation, has been obsolete since the 1880s — a lot like bicycling and walking.

Yes, that’s right, bicycling and walking are “obsolete.”

The things one learns reading the Weekly Standard.

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