No intention of repealing the repeal

NO INTENTION OF REPEALING THE REPEAL…. After a century-long struggle to pass health care reform, the very first thing Republicans said after the passage of the Affordable Care Act was that they’d repeal it.

After the devastation of the near-collapse of the global financial system, Republicans fought tooth and nail to prevent new safeguards and reforms to the industry. Again, the very first thing the GOP said after Democrats approved Wall Street reform was that they’d repeal it.

Over the weekend, Democrats, two independents, and eight Republicans repealed the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy. Any chance the emboldened GOP might try to repeal the repeal? Apparently not.

The No. 2 Senate Republican said Monday that he didn’t plan to seek a repeal of this weekend’s vote to repeal “Don’t ask, don’t tell.”

Sen. Jon Kyl (Ariz.), the GOP whip, suggested that Republicans — or at least he himself — wouldn’t look to undo the actions taken by Congress last week to lift the ban on openly gay and lesbian members of the military.

“No, I don’t have any plan in place,” Kyl said on Fox News on Monday when asked if he had a plan to repeal the repeal of “Don’t ask, don’t tell.”

That’s good to hear, I suppose, but I’m curious about something. For Republicans who opposed DADT repeal — which is to say, the majority of the Republican caucuses from both chambers — the legislation that passed is both wrong and dangerous. To hear them tell it, the bill will put our troops at risk, undermine the war efforts, and in the mind of Louis Gohmert, put the entire country on the road to ruin.

So why wouldn’t they try to undo what Dems have done? They want to repeal the Affordable Care Act and Wall Street reform, but what they see as a radical, anti-military gambit is a done deal going forward?

It’s almost as if Republicans don’t really expect the shift in policy to be dangerous at all.