Tuesday’s campaign round-up

TUESDAY’S CAMPAIGN ROUND-UP…. Today’s installment of campaign-related news items that wouldn’t necessarily generate a post of their own, but may be of interest to political observers:

* As expected, Rep. Dean Heller (R) officially launched his U.S. Senate campaign in Nevada today, and hopes to replace retiring Sen. John Ensign (R). It’s unclear if Heller will face a credible primary opponent, but he appears to be the frontrunner overall.

* In a new Public Policy Polling survey conducted for Daily Kos, three GOP state senators in Wisconsin appear likely to be recalled, and others are in danger.

* On a related note, Wisconsin Democrats have, as of yesterday, collected 45% of the signatures they’ll need to force recall elections for eight GOP state senators.

* One of the eight targeted Republicans is facing a particularly embarrassing situation — his own wife has signed a recall petition against him, after he left her for a 25-year old mistress.

* Is former governor and DNC Chairman Tim Kaine running for the Senate in Virginia next year? As of yesterday, he is “increasingly likely” to run.

* Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour’s (R) press secretary was forced to abruptly resign yesterday after revelations that he’d circulated tasteless jokes about the Japan earthquake.

* Former Charlotte Mayor Pat McCrory (R) appears likely to run against North Carolina Gov. Bev Perdue (D) next year, setting up a rematch of the 2008 race.

* Former Florida House Majority Leader Adam Hasner is the latest Republican to set up a U.S. Senate exploratory committee, expanding the field of GOP candidates hoping to take on Sen. Bill Nelson (D) next year.

* And speaking of Florida, the DCCC hoped to recruit former Rep. Ron Klein (D) to launch a rematch against Rep. Allen West (R) next year in Florida’s 22nd, but that now appears unlikely, with Klein accepting a position with a local lobbying firm.

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