From the Weekend

FROM THE WEEKEND…. We covered a fair amount of ground over the weekend. Here’s a quick overview of what you may have missed.

On Sunday, we talked about:

* Sen. Dick Lugar (R-Ind.) reminds the political world that military operations actually do cost money. He’s right.

* Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) wants Americans to support President Obama as military efforts in Libya get underway, but first McCain wants to whine about Obama just a little more.

* Congressional Republicans, at the behest of bank lobbyists, consider Elizabeth Warren part of the problem. That’s backwards.

* Former half-term Gov. Sarah Palin (R) slammed U.S. leaders from foreign soil. That used to be a real no-no.

* Fox News is pretty worked up about the president visiting Latin America to promote trade and open markets. Despite the Republican rhetoric, this isn’t a vacation.

* “Operation Odyssey Dawn” gets underway.

And on Saturday, we talked about:

* To look at Republican politics and assume there’s a “transformation” underway, from a “fanatically anti-Obama” party to a “fanatically anti-spending” one, is to miss all of the relevant details.

* What do the governors of Ohio, Florida, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, and Michigan have in common? They’re all rookie Republicans, with far-right agendas, who are struggling badly to impress voters.

* In “This Week in God,” we covered the renewed GOP efforts to attack evolutionary biology at the state level.

* Defunding NPR won’t save jobs. It won’t even save money.

* Turning IRS agents into abortion cops through the “No Taxpayer Funding for Abortion Act” is a horrifically bad idea.

* Disgraced former House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) is supposed to be the guy who offers intellectual firepower for Republicans on the national level. Given his latest remarks on Libya, that’s pretty laughable.

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