From the weekend

FROM THE WEEKEND…. We covered a fair amount of ground over the weekend. Here’s a quick overview of what you may have missed.

On Sunday, we talked about:

* The usual refrain — “American families balance their budget budgets; why can’t Washington?” — breaks down when families take on all kinds of worthwhile debts.

* Sen. Mark Kirk’s (R-Ill.) habit of irresponsible public remarks hasn’t gone away. This time, it’s the debt ceiling.

* In Florida, Republican officials find it easier to rig the game than earning the public’s trust.

* Why is Sen. John Ensign (R-Nev.) resigning on May 3? Because he was scheduled to testify under oath on May 4.

* Despite what you may have heard from Minnesota’s Republican state House Speaker, voting isn’t a “privilege.”

*The recent anti-democratic moves by Republican officials in Michigan are pretty extraordinary.

* Congressional Republicans have a plan for how to spend the month of May: mindlessly exploit gas prices for partisan gain.

* Why was the Rev. Franklin Graham the headliner on ABC’s “This Week”?

On Saturday, we talked about:

* David Frum is a conservative who believes a social insurance state should exist. If only others on the right could bring themselves to agree.

* Charles Krauthammer wants the GOP to base the 2012 cycle on “the nature of the American social contract.” I suspect Dems wouldn’t mind.

* Why is Franklin Graham comfortable with Donald Trump as a presidential candidate?

* In “This Week in God,” we covered, among other things, Texas Gov. Rick Perry (R) responding to a statewide fire emergency by urging his constituents to pray for rain.

* Sen. John McCain’s (R-Ariz.) visit to Libya last week was a whole lot different than his last visit to Libya, 18 months ago.

* Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) is the first Senate Republican to declare her opposition to Paul Ryan’s House Republican budget plan.

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