From the weekend

We covered a fair amount of ground over the weekend. Here’s a quick overview of what you may have missed.

On Sunday, we talked about:

* House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) is worried about upsetting our creditors and exorbitant interest rates. So, he’s pursuing a strategy likely to upset our creditors and cause exorbitant interest rates.

* Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) wants to impress Standard & Poor’s. He appears to have forgotten 2008.

* As Newt Gingrich helps remind us, the Jim Crow era may be gone, but it’s not forgotten.

* The easiest way to win an election has nothing to do with candidates, fundraising, or grassroots operations. It’s to stack the deck long before the election — rigging the system so that those most likely to vote the “wrong” way simply don’t get to participate.

* News Corp won’t stop making campaign contributions to boost Republicans, but it will start disclosing the contributions.

* The guest lists for yesterday’s five main Sunday shows: two Republican presidential candidates, two House Republican leaders, two Senate Republican leaders, one Republican governor, one former Republican governor, two Bush administration officials, and one Democrat.

* Mike Huckabee isn’t running for president.

And on Saturday, we talked about:

* Huckabee has a new company selling ridiculous educational videos to children. Did you know knife-wielding black people wearing disco t-shirts were apparently a real national problem, right up until Reagan got government out of the way? Wait until crude animation explains it to your kids.

* Charles Krauthammer heard President Obama’s speech on immigration, and has concluded that the president is uncivil and a big meanie. No, seriously, that’s the argument.

* Those on the terrorist watch list can’t buy an airplane. Thanks to conservatives in Congress, they can buy loaded firearms.

* In “This Week in God,” we talked about, among other things, a flap on Capitol Hill over the new House Chaplain nominee.

* The Democratic Party’s line on taxes would be much easier to maintain were it not for so many “centrist” Dems worried about re-election.

* Almost a year to the day after his son did the same thing, Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas) explained his opposition to the Civil Rights Act of 1964.