From the weekend

We covered a fair amount of ground over the weekend. Here’s a quick overview of what you may have missed

On Sunday, we talked about:

* Jon Stewart argued on “Fox News Sunday” that Fox News viewers are “the most consistently misinformed” news consumers, in “every poll.” That happens to be quantifiably true.

* Fox News’ Chris Wallace think the media’s treatment of Sarah Palin’s emails is evidence of liberal “bias.” That doesn’t make any sense.

* Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas seems to have a fairly serious ethics problem.

* Joe Lieberman’s willingness to pal around with Glenn Beck isn’t just a lapse in good judgment. It’s more of a denouement of Lieberman’s years-long slide into routinely bad judgment.

* The Koch Brothers’ Americans for Prosperity is aggressively pushing the line that the Obama administration wants to raise gas prices on purpose. That’s wrong on all kinds of levels.

* Organizers of the Republican Leadership Conference thought it’d be fun to have a President Obama impersonator bring some levity to their event. They were sorely mistaken.

And on Saturday, we talked about:

* Fareed Zakaria believes conservatives have “lost touch with reality.” I’m very glad he noticed.

* In “This Week in God,” we covered, among other things, the propriety of Texas Gov. Rick Perry’s (R) upcoming rival meeting, called “The Response.”

* You won’t believe what organizers make the kids do at the Tea Party summer camp in Tampa.

* Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-Minn.) has a habit of creating amazing conspiracy theories. Her latest — President Obama secretly wants to destroy Medicare — is a doozy, even for her.

* Even now, “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” dead-enders in the House still can’t help themselves.

* The domestic divisions over U.S. policy in Libya are intensifying, including disagreements among leading attorneys in the Obama administration.

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