From the weekend

We covered a fair amount of ground over the weekend. Here’s a quick overview of what you may have missed

On Sunday, we talked about:

* For the rest of this Congress, President Obama needs to understand that whatever he’s for, Congress will be against.

* If contemporary rules applied, Lincoln and FDR would probably be considered huge sellouts who were too quick to compromise, even when their vital principles were at stake.

* Jeff Greenfield is the latest establishment pundit to argue “both sides” are to blame for the debt-ceiling mess. It’s lazy thinking, and it’s wrong.

* Every time a confused Republican lawmakers compare the United States’ fiscal conditions to that of Greece, an angel loses its wings. I’m looking at you, Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.).

* As the drop-dead Aug. 2 deadline looms, there’s a flurry of activity, though evidence of actual progress remains elusive.

And on Saturday, we talked about:

* Whether a deal comes together by Aug. 2 or not, congressional Republicans have already demonstrated to the world that the legislative branch of the United States cannot be trust to govern responsibly. The global implications of this may prove to be enormous.

* Why would the Obama White House pursue spending cuts, when the economy needs the opposite? The truth is less crazy that it might appear.

* Obama thinks popular opinion is on his side in the debt fight; Republicans disagree. Not only is the president correct, but it’s a bizarre fight for the GOP to even start.

* With increasing frequency, Mitt Romney’s atrocious jobs record is drawing attention. Saturday, the DNC had a little fun going after Romney’s failures with a NASCAR-themed video.

* GOP officials are convinced the country doesn’t have a revenue problem. They couldn’t be more wrong.

* Tim Pawlenty’s position on the debt ceiling is so absurd, it should probably disqualify him from public office.

* In “This Week in God,” we covered, among other things, what drove Michele Bachmann to leave her evangelical Minnesota church.

* House Republicans won’t listen to economists, Wall Street, the Federal Reserve, the Treasury Department, or their House Speaker. Will they listen to Paul Ryan?