Friday’s Mini-Report

Today’s edition of quick hits:

* Europe: “Once again disappointing investors looking for European leaders to end their bickering over a rescue plan for the euro zone, finance ministers failed Friday to find common ground. They also found themselves at odds with the U.S. Treasury secretary, Timothy F. Geithner, who, after his highly unusual attendance at a meeting of top European officials, warned them that a lack of decisive action could leave ‘the fate of Europe’ to outsiders.”

* Turkey: “Turkey’s prime minister said Friday that his once-close allies in Syria’s authoritarian regime will fall in a reckoning for the bloody crackdown on their own people, as activists there reported at least 17 more dead in new raids on anti-government protesters. One protest group put the death toll as high as 32.”

* Turtle Bay: “The Palestinian president announced Friday that he would seek membership for a Palestinian state at the United Nations Security Council next week, a move strongly opposed by Israel and the United States that adds significant tension to one of the most intractable conflicts in the Middle East.”

* Buck had already been given his last meal: “At about 7:40 p.m. the U.S. Supreme Court stayed the scheduled execution of Duane Edward Buck.”

* The America Invents Act: “President Barack Obama said a law overhauling the U.S. patent system will clear the way for inventors and entrepreneurs to attract investment and create jobs, making the U.S. more competitive.”

* AFL-CIO president Richard Trumka and AFSCME chief Gerald McEntee are on board with a plan to have the Murray/Hensarling super-committee score proposals for their impact on jobs.

* With the Obama administration slowing down deportations, House Republicans get desperate to speed them up.

* Sen. Olympia Snowe (R-Maine) talks constantly about the need for comprehensive tax reform. Then why doesn’t she work on a bill for comprehensive tax reform?

* The White House’s decision to steer clear of Social Security “reform” in the debt-reduction plan makes a lot of sense.

* Karl Rove is still hung up on the Jimmy Hoffa comments from Labor Day? Time to move on, Karl.

* Are American SAT scores declining? Yes. Does that matter? Not really.

* And finally, Paul Krugman: “Modern conservatism is actually a deeply radical movement, one that is hostile to the kind of society we’ve had for the past three generations — that is, a society that, acting through the government, tries to mitigate some of the ‘common hazards of life’ through such programs as Social Security, unemployment insurance, Medicare and Medicaid. Are voters ready to embrace such a radical rejection of the kind of America we’ve all grown up in? I guess we’ll find out next year.”

Anything to add? Consider this an open thread.