Primary Night in New Hampshire

The results in New Hampshire are already starting to trickle in, so it’s time for a primary night open thread.

I’ll update this post with results and noteworthy developments as they’re available, but in the meantime, I thought I’d open the floor to some discussion.

Let’s hear it.

7:45 p.m.: Nearly one in five voters made their decision on who to support today? What have these people been waiting for?

8 p.m.: NBC News and CNN have already called the race for Romney. That surprises no one — it’s always been a question of what his margin of victory would be (and who finished second).

8:05 p.m.: Exit-poll results are available here (among other places).

8:07 p.m.: Fox News says Ron Paul will finish second, with Jon Huntsman third. Of course, Fox News says a lot of things.

8:20 p.m.: With about 16% of the votes in, Romney is ahead with 35.3%, followed by Paul at 24.7%, Huntsman at 17.5%, Gingrich at 10.4%, and Santorum at 9.6%. Rick Perry is not only last, he’s below 1% and barely ahead of Roemer.

8:30 p.m.: Romney boasted to supporters tonight that they helped make “history.” That’s true — no non-incumbent Republican has ever won the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primary in the same cycle. Of course, since Romney lives in New Hampshire for much of the year, he had an advantage no other GOP presidential candidate has enjoyed.

8:45 p.m.: With about 25% of the votes in, this is already pretty dull. Romney is first with 35.3%, followed by Paul at 25%, Huntsman at 16.9%, Gingrich at 10.3%, and Santorum at 10.2%. (The closest race is for fourth, and no one, including the candidates, care which way it turns out.) Rick Perry is still below 1%, which I find vaguely amusing.

9 p.m.: Unlike a week ago, when the outcome was very much in doubt until very late at night, it occurs to me there’s no point in blogging about a contest when the results are already obvious. So, I’m wrapping this up. Feel free to consider this an open thread, and be sure to check in tomorrow morning for more commentary and analysis.