Sex and Politics

Nope, not another sex scandal post (although I do want to congratulate Mark Sanford and Maria Belen Chapur on their engagement). Instead, this is a story about using sex – or, more accurately, the lack thereof – as a political tactic. As the AP reports:

The female wing of a civil rights group is urging women in Togo to stage a week-long sex strike to demand the resignation of the country’s president. Women are being asked to start withholding sex from their husbands or partners as of Monday, said Isabelle Ameganvi, leader of the women’s wing of the group Let’s Save Togo. She said the strike will put pressure on Togo’s men to take action against President Faure Gnassingbe. Ameganvi, a lawyer, told The Associated Press that her group is following the example of Liberia’s women, who used a sex strike in 2003 to campaign for peace.

The full article is available here. [h/t to Daniel Lippman.]

[Cross-posted at The Monkey Cage]

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Joshua Tucker

Joshua Tucker is a Professor of Politics at New York University.