We Are So Far From Owning Our Responsibilities

Although some people dispute this, when the sun comes up in the morning, it is sometimes described as a sunrise. In other news, when you torture someone to death, it is sometimes described as torture. This is the insight of The Hill‘s Mario Trujillo, who managed to get the following published without spontaneously combusting:

A forthcoming report on the defunct CIA enhanced interrogation program “tells a story of which no American is proud,” according to leaked State Department talking points.

The White House on Wednesday accidentally emailed The Associated Press the proposed “topline messages” the department prepared in anticipation of the declassification of the Senate Intelligence Committee report.

The executive summary of the committee’s report on the Bush-era techniques — sometimes described as torture — is expected to be declassified in the next few weeks.

The CIA’s use of torture is not the end of the story. People were murdered:

The American Civil Liberties Union today made public an analysis of new and previously released autopsy and death reports of detainees held in U.S. facilities in Iraq and Afghanistan, many of whom died while being interrogated. The documents show that detainees were hooded, gagged, strangled, beaten with blunt objects, subjected to sleep deprivation and to hot and cold environmental conditions.

“”There is no question that U.S. interrogations have resulted in deaths,”” said Anthony D. Romero, Executive Director of the ACLU. “”High-ranking officials who knew about the torture and sat on their hands and those who created and endorsed these policies must be held accountable. America must stop putting its head in the sand and deal with the torture scandal that has rocked our military.””

We’ve buried this information so deeply that our reporters can’t even begin to call it murder. They can’t even call it torture. It is “sometimes described” that way, but, you know, opinions differ.

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Martin Longman

Martin Longman is the web editor for the Washington Monthly. See all his writing at ProgressPond.com