Lunch Buffet

Last night got caught a couple of times during choir practice checking for the score of a key game for my Georgia Bulldogs men’s basketball team. They won over Ole Miss 76-72, probably punching a ticket for the NCAA tournament, and I made it through a final rehearsal of the Bach arrangement of Luther’s Lenten classic, “Out of the Depths I Cry to Thee.”

Here are some less stressful midday news/views treats:

* FCC set to vote on new net neutrality rules today.

* At the Plum Line, Paul Waldman argues net neutrality is good positive example of how progressive activists can influence Obama administration.

* Boehner still silent on clean DHS funding bill.

* WI Senate passes “right-to-work” bill on party-line vote. It goes to Assembly next week, and then to Scott Walker’s eager pen.

* In case you were wondering how Eric Cantor’s doing…. he’s back in DC holding fundraisers.

And in non-political news:

* Just-suspended Louisville Cardinal basketball star facing charges of rape and forcible sodomy.

As we break for lunch, here’s Sandie Shaw performing the song that made her the first British winner of the Eurovision Song Contest in 1967, “Puppet on a String.” Sandie reportedly didn’t like the song. She was probably less than enthused by this video in which she’s surrounded by a large number of decidedly un-hip white people. It is Europe, after all.

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Ed Kilgore

Ed Kilgore is a political columnist for New York and managing editor at the Democratic Strategist website. He was a contributing writer at the Washington Monthly from January 2012 until November 2015, and was the principal contributor to the Political Animal blog.