Fiorina Really Has a Problem With the Little People Behind the Scenes

In their appreciation of her prowess as a speaker, and in desperate need for a woman to put on the stage to bash Hillary Clinton 24/7 without fear of looking piggish, Republicans everywhere are overlooking a couple of problems with Carly Fiorina’s resume. First, there’s the fact that she got fired as CEO of Hewlitt-Packer after laying off an estimated 30,000 employees or so (the exact number is disputed). Second, there’s the additional fact that she used her golden parachute from the HP debacle to run a U.S. Senate campaign that lost by a landslide in the most pro-GOP year in practically forever.

But the parallel stories of incompetence and indifference to the Little People got a new boost today from this news, per Reuters’ Michelle Conlin:

Politics has a well-known revolving door, with candidates often rehiring consultants, strategists and vendors as they move from one campaign to the next. But for Republican presidential contender Carly Fiorina, that might not be so easy.

Twelve of about 30 people who worked on Fiorina’s failed 2010 California Senate campaign, most speaking out for the first time, told Reuters they would not work for her again. Fiorina, once one of America’s most powerful businesswomen, is now campaigning for the Republican nomination in 2016.

The reason: for more than four years, Fiorina – who has an estimated net worth of up to $120 million – didn’t pay them, a review of Federal Election Commission records shows.

On the campaign trail, the former Hewlett-Packard (HPQ.N) CEO has portrayed herself as a battle-hardened business leader who possesses the best financial skills among fellow Republican presidential hopefuls. But some former staffers on her Senate campaign are now raising questions about that portrayal.

Federal campaign filings show that, until a few months before Fiorina announced her presidential bid on May 4, she still owed staffers, consultants, strategists, legal experts and vendors nearly half a million dollars….

“I’d rather go to Iraq than work for Carly Fiorina again,” said one high-level former campaign staffer, who asked not to be identified, citing disclosure restrictions in his contract.

Nice.

Ed Kilgore

Ed Kilgore, a Monthly contributing editor, is a columnist for the Daily Intelligencer, New York magazine’s politics blog, and the managing editor for the Democratic Strategist.