The Alternative To Foundation-Funded Education Journalism: Sponsorships & Subscriptions

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There are not one but two ads from the NEA and AFT in today’s edition of Politico’s Morning Education (Failing schools can’t buy success), both urging Congress to pass a revamped version of ESEA.

Is that a problem? Not really. They’re both clearly identified as promotions, and the email version of the newsletter is clearly identified as being sponsored the two teachers unions, so there’s little chance of reader confusion. 

The first:

** A message from the National Education Association and American Federation of Teachers: This summer, both chambers of Congress made progress in passing versions of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. Let’s finish the job now and produce a final product that takes the best of both bills. All children deserve a great public education: Let’s get ESEA done. Let’s get ESEA right. bit.ly/getESEAdone **

For all those concerned about foundation support for education journalism, this is an example of the traditional alternative: Politico sells early access and premium content to high-rolling subscribers, and sells ads and sponsorships like these for additional revenue. (They also host sponsored events.)

Related posts: Politico’s Big Education PackageBehind The Scenes At Morning EducationWhat The Gates Foundation’s Learned About Funding Education JournalismLet’s Think About Journalism Funding More Reflectively

Alexander Russo

Alexander Russo is a freelance education writer who has created several long-running blogs such as the national news site This Week In Education, District 299 (about Chicago schools), and LA School Report. He can be reached on Twitter at @alexanderrusso, on Facebook, or directly at alexanderrusso@gmail.com.