Roundup: As DC Gentrifies, So Do Charters (Plus: Chromebooks!)

Charter schools appealing to more diverse families as D.C. gentrifies Washington Post: Charter schools that serve the greatest mix of students tend to be in central parts of the city, in proximity to gentrified neighborhoods such as Columbia Heights and Brookland. They are in high demand, with an influx of higher-income families who are looking for alternatives to lower-performing, segregated neighborhood schools.

Education 101: Google Chromebooks Multiply in U.S. Classrooms  CNBC: So Apple is taking a different approach— win over teachers. The Cupertino-based company is developing an app to provide teachers with real-time student data analytics, which many expect will be rolled out in the spring in partnership with IBM, according to Fisher. (Neither Apple nor IBM would comment.)

Online Classes Appeal More to the Affluent NYT: Residents of poor neighborhoods are less likely than those in wealthier ones to enroll in free online courses, a study finds.

Learning is an ‘expedition’ at schools that enhance class with field work Washington Post: The expeditions are typically interdisciplinary. Pre-kindergarten students are learning this fall about nutrition. In an art class on a November morning, they told their teacher Leah Carpenter Quinter about some of the food groups they have been learning about, including vegetables, proteins and grains. Quinter told them: “I have some exciting news: Artists often use food in their artwork.”

School Board Approves Controversial Deal In Transgender Student Case WNYC: About 400 people — mostly adults and a few students — filled row after row of folding chairs in a high school cafeteria turned into an auditorium for District 211’s special school board meeting.

Ex-Vice Principal Pleads Guilty to Buying Booze for Student AP: A former vice principal at West Potomac High School has pleaded guilty to buying alcohol for one of his students after last year’s homecoming dance.

For A Schoolboy With AIDS, A Principal Opened Doors — By Opening His Arms NPR: At a time when even doctors refused to see his adoptive son, Tom Graziano found solace in the way his elementary school principal embraced him. “I want to thank you,” Graziano tells him years later.

What San Bernardino teachers are doing to help their students cope LA Times: Frank Dominguez Elementary School, for example, is close to the attacks and to the site where suspects Syed Farook and Tashfeen Malik were killed in a shootout with police. Members of the district’s crisis team, which consists of counselors and psychologists, were dispatched there, Strachan said.  

Alexander Russo

Alexander Russo is a freelance education writer who has created several long-running blogs such as the national news site This Week In Education, District 299 (about Chicago schools), and LA School Report. He can be reached on Twitter at @alexanderrusso, on Facebook, or directly at alexanderrusso@gmail.com.