Quick Takes

* This is an even worse characteristic in a president than being a Marcobot.

[T]o those who have known him longest, Rubio’s flustered performance Saturday night fit perfectly with an all-too-familiar strain of his personality, one that his handlers and image-makers have labored for years to keep out of public view. Though generally seen as cool-headed and quick on his feet, Rubio is known to friends, allies, and advisers for a kind of incurable anxiousness — and an occasional propensity to panic in moments of crisis, both real and imagined.

* For a few years now we’ve all been suggesting that the Republicans have simply ignored the autopsy performed by the RNC following the 2012 election. But Jim Geraghty basically pronounces it dead.

The RNC report’s advocacy for a path to citizenship was a slap in the face to those Republicans who had long been angry about illegal immigration.

In other words, it’s time to go “all in” with that angry nativist base. We’ll see how that works out for ya.

* Bill Scher gives us some history about “Why it’s OK to Accept Wall Street Campaign Cash.”

What do Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, Franklin Roosevelt, Teddy Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson all have in common? They all accepted campaign contributions from Wall Street tycoons.

And, for those on that list who have already been president, all successfully imposed regulations on corporations anyway.

* Basically, the Virginia State Board of Elections is saying to the court: “You know that past 200 years of slavery and racial discrimination against African Americans in this state? Well…let’s ignore all that when you decide whether or not our new voter ID law is legal.

* When someone writes “Why the Working Class is Choosing Trump and Sanders,” it is important to start reading that as: Why the White Working Class is Choosing Trump and Sanders.

* At Republic 3.0, Jeremy Smith and David Mitchell write about a new bill that would help boost Americans’ retirement security by expanding the federal match for contributions into retirement accounts:

* Finally, as you watch the returns from the New Hampshire primary tonight, there isn’t much doubt about who the winners are going to be. But Eric Levitz gives us another angle to keep an eye on.

So the question tonight is margin of victory. Many pundits have argued that a double-digit win would mark a triumph for the socialist insurgent. But if Sanders wins by a margin of 55 to 45 percent, Hillary Clinton will walk away with an even share of New Hampshire’s delegates.

…as long as Clinton gets above 43.8 percent of the vote, she’s entitled to half the state’s delegates.

Nancy LeTourneau

Nancy LeTourneau is a contributing writer for the Washington Monthly.