JACQUES CHIRAC, TERROR MASTER….Michael Ledeen

JACQUES CHIRAC, TERROR MASTER….Michael Ledeen has long been one of the more, um, visionary thinkers among conservative hawks, essentially advocating U.S. military action against the entire Middle East. Today Digby points us to Ledeen’s latest missive, an effort to understand those darn French and explain why they willfully continue to oppose us in the face of our obvious righteousness:

So the French and the Germans struck a deal with radical Islam and with radical Arabs: You go after the United States, and we’ll do everything we can to protect you, and we will do everything we can to weaken the Americans.

The Franco-German strategy was based on using Arab and Islamic extremism and terrorism as the weapon of choice, and the United Nations as the straitjacket for blocking a decisive response from the United States.

As near as I can tell, this is the conservative version of the “It’s all about oil” argument from lefty peace activists. France has always considered itself a counterweight to the United States in the Arab world, so there’s probably a kernel of truth in the idea that their position is partly an effort to curry favor with Arab states.

Unfortunately, that thesis isn’t interesting enough for Ledeen, who insists on making it into some grand conspiracy theory in which, Illuminati-like, Jacques Chirac is secretly Osama’s right hand man, plotting terrorist attacks as a way of keeping the perfidious Americans too busy to export their lousy Hollywood movies to Paris.

As Digby points out, it’s one thing for a few crazy bloggers to say stuff like this, but “Michael Ledeen gets invited to the White House. He is crazy as a loon.” Maybe he should get together with the Bible Code nutcase who’s been helping out our intelligence analysts.

Support Nonprofit Journalism

If you enjoyed this article, consider making a donation to help us produce more like it. The Washington Monthly was founded in 1969 to tell the stories of how government really works—and how to make it work better. Fifty years later, the need for incisive analysis and new, progressive policy ideas is clearer than ever. As a nonprofit, we rely on support from readers like you.

Yes, I’ll make a donation