Amnesty International Film Festival

AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL….Interested in seeing a free movie and mingling with some Washington Monthly editors? If you live in the Washington DC area, we have a limited number of tickets available for the Washington Amnesty International Film Festival, cosponsored by National Geographic and The Washington Monthly. There’s one film on Thursday and one on Saturday. Here are the details:

5:00 pm Wednesday Update: Our allotment of tickets for Thursday’s film is gone. However, tickets are still available for Saturday’s film.

Thursday: The invitations are for the opening reception (6:00 pm), the film premier (7:30 pm), and the after film discussion.

DARWIN?S NIGHTMARE
Director: Hubert Sauper
Documentary. 2004. 107 min. English/Russian/Swahili, subtitled.

Hubert Sauper?s riveting documentary examines the devastating effect of the introduction of the Nile perch to Tanzania’s Lake Victoria. It is a tale about fish, but also about starvation and globalization. Winner of the Best Documentary Award at the 2004 European Film Awards.

Saturday: Invitations are for the screening at 7:00 pm.

INNOCENT VOICES
Director: Luis Mandoki
Feature Film. 2004. 111 min. Spanish, subtitled.

This feature film tells the poignant tale of an 11-year-old boy who suddenly becomes the “man of the house” after his father abandons the family during El Salvador?s civil war.

Both events are in Washington at the National Geographic’s Grosvenor Auditorium, 1600 M Street, NW (16th & M). The invitations include free parking in National Geographic’s adjacent garage.

If you’re interested in attending, e-mail a ticket request to service@washingtonmonthly.com and include your name, contact phone number and e-mail address.

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