Wednesday’s Mini-Report

WEDNESDAY’S MINI-REPORT…. Today’s edition of quick hits:

* Somehow, we seem to have reached the point at which a 189-point drop in the market doesn’t seem like such a bad day.

* The good news is, John McCain has come up with an actual mortgage policy of his own, called the “American Homeownership Resurgence Plan” (notice the use of the word “surge”). The bad news is, it’s an awful policy.

* Obama, not surprisingly, rejected McCain’s new plan out of hand.

* Speaker Pelosi is weighing a second stimulus package.

* John McCain today referred to Americans as “my fellow prisoners.” How odd.

* Lieberman is “worried” that Obama may not bomb Iran. I think he meant it as criticism.

* If you missed yesterday’s AIG hearing on the Hill, it was a doozy.

* It’s hard to overstate how insane it is that Fox News will pay Sean Hannity $20 million a year through 2012.

* Even major networks are picking up on the hate and rage apparent at McCain campaign rallies.

* New York Times editorial: “It is a sorry fact of American political life that campaigns get ugly, often in their final weeks. But Senator John McCain and Gov. Sarah Palin have been running one of the most appalling campaigns we can remember. They have gone far beyond the usual fare of quotes taken out of context and distortions of an opponent’s record — into the dark territory of race-baiting and xenophobia.”

* Like John Cole, I have no idea why the RNC would run an ad featuring Obama criticizing his critics’ dishonesty. It’s one of the cycle’s stranger spots.

* I’ve seen some painful press conferences, but it’s been a while since I’ve seen something this painful. No wonder Norm Coleman is in trouble in Minnesota.

* And Martin Chalfie won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry, and one of the first things he did after learning of the honor is endorse Obama. Chalfie is the 63rd Nobel Prize winner to endorse the Democrat’s campaign.

Anything to add? Consider this an open thread.

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Steve Benen

Steve Benen is a producer at MSNBC's The Rachel Maddow Show. He was the principal contributor to the Washington Monthly's Political Animal blog from August 2008 until January 2012.