Friday’s Mini-Report

FRIDAY’S MINI-REPORT…. Today’s edition of quick hits:

* The markets rose early on, in response to Bush’s loans to GM and Chrysler, but by the end of the close, the early gains were largely gone.

* I think it’s fair to say the economy in California qualifies as “not good.”

* Obama introduced the rest of his cabinet this afternoon, introducing his nominees to lead the Departments of Labor and Transportation, and serve as the U.S. Trade Representative. Perhaps the only real surprise was Obama’s choice of Maine economist Karen Mills, a close ally of Sen. Olympia Snowe (R-Maine), to be administrator of the Small Business Administration (SBA).

* It was, by the way, Obama’s 12th press conference as president-elect, breaking a record for modern presidents — and he still has a month to go.

* As I type, Al Franken leads Norm Coleman in Minnesota by 249 votes.

* David Safavian, a former associate of disgraced ex-lobbyist Jack Abramoff, has been found guilty of multiple criminal counts, again.

* Krugman has a good item on the Madoff Economy.

* Sargent has a good item on what’s “new” about Obama’s style of politics.

* Cohn has a good item explaining why Bush’s loan package for the auto industry is a good idea.

* Lind had a good item on why the South wants to undermine the North’s auto industry. (thanks to J.P. for the tip)

* Things didn’t work out too well for Rep. John Dingell (D-Mich.) when it came to the chairmanship of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, but new Chairman Henry Waxman (D-Calif.) has rewarded Dingell with a good consolation prize: taking the lead of healthcare initiatives in the next Congress.

* Joe Scarborough knows even less about science than he does about current events. Scary, but true.

* If a politician’s daughter’s fiance’s mother has a run in with the law, it probably shouldn’t be national news. Just sayin’.

* And finally, W. Mark Felt Sr., the associate director of the FBI during the Watergate scandal who, and the man best known as “Deep Throat,” died yesterday. He was 95.

Anything to add? Consider this an open thread.

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