Tuesday’s campaign round-up

TUESDAY’S CAMPAIGN ROUND-UP….Today’s installment of campaign-related news items that wouldn’t generate a post of their own, but may be of interest to political observers.

* As was expected, former eBay CEO Meg Whitman kicked off her Republican gubernatorial campaign in California yesterday, formally launching an exploratory committee. She will likely face state Insurance Commissioner Steve Poizner in a GOP primary.

* Speaking of exploratory committees, Ohio Lt. Gov. Lee Fisher (D) got his Senate campaign underway yesterday. Fisher will enjoy the support of Ohio Gov. Ted Strickland (D).

* And speaking of Strickland, a couple of high-profile Republicans are lining up to challenge the governor in 2010, but the latest Quinnipiac poll shows the incumbent with a huge edge.

* Is MSNBC host Joe Scarborough mulling over a Senate campaign in Florida next year? That’s the rumor.

* Colorado’s newly-appointed Sen. Michael Bennet (D) is apparently still struggling a little to introduce himself to voters who don’t yet recognize him. He’ll need to work on that — Andrew Romanoff, the well-known former Speaker of the Colorado House, is mulling a primary challenge.

* It’s bound to be a large Democratic field, but Sen. Arlen Specter (R-Pa.) has drawn his first of many challengers: Joe Torsella, a former president of the National Constitution Center and the current chairman of the State Board of Education, formed an exploratory committee yesterday.

* Remember Tennessee state House Speaker Kent Williams? The Republican who pulled a fast one on his GOP colleagues and became Speaker with the help of Democrats? Williams has been formally kicked out of the Republican Party for his actions.

* If Rep. Heath Shuler (D-N.C.) is thinking about possibly running for the Senate, he shouldn’t pick fights with the Democratic congressional leadership.

Support Nonprofit Journalism

If you enjoyed this article, consider making a donation to help us produce more like it. The Washington Monthly was founded in 1969 to tell the stories of how government really works—and how to make it work better. Fifty years later, the need for incisive analysis and new, progressive policy ideas is clearer than ever. As a nonprofit, we rely on support from readers like you.

Yes, I’ll make a donation