Thursday’s campaign round-up

THURSDAY’S CAMPAIGN ROUND-UP….Today’s installment of campaign-related news items that wouldn’t generate a post of their own, but may be of interest to political observers.

* Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal (R) has been tapped for a high-profile gig: giving the Republican response to President Obama’s speech before a joint session of Congress on Feb. 24. Jindal has been rumored as a likely presidential candidate in 2012.

* New York Gov. David Paterson (D) announced yesterday that there will be a special election for Kirsten Gillibrand’s vacant House seat on March 31.

* Speaking of Gillibrand’s vacant House seat, Democrat Scott Murphy, hoping to succeed Gillibrand, has already launched an ad campaign. Murphy, who will face off against Republican James Tedisco, has already spent nearly $250,000 of his own money on the campaign.

* A Quinnipiac poll found that Republican Sen. Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania is, as expected, vulnerable in his re-election bid next year. The poll shows 43% said Specter doesn’t deserve another term, while 40% said he does. Oddly enough, Specter enjoys more support from Pennsylvania Democrats than Pennsylvania Republicans.

* Democratic Sen. Roland Burris of Illinois is also looking shaky for 2010. A Chicago Tribune poll found only 37% of in-state voters believe Burris should seek a full term. Burris currently enjoys a 34% favorability rating, though a plurality (43%) have no opinion.

* If Rep. Paul Hodes (D-N.H.) runs for the Senate next year, as has been long rumored, he’ll enjoy a slight edge on his likely Republican opponents. Rep. Carol Shea-Porter (D-N.H.), another possible Senate candidate, is also competitive, but does less well in hypothetical match-ups against former Sen. John Sununu and former Rep. Charlie Bass.

* If Florida Gov. Charlie Crist (R) decides to run for the Senate next year, a new poll shows he’s be the overwhelming favorite. Part of this, though, is the result of low name recognition for the Democrats seeking the seat.

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