Dept. of Pots and Kettles

DEPT. OF POTS AND KETTLES…. Sen. David Vitter (R-La.) still hasn’t figured out the benefits of quiet time.

Louisiana Sen. David Vitter (R), who survived a 2007 sex scandal, called on Sen. Roland Burris (D-Ill.) to resign Tuesday for his ethical shortcomings.

Oh my.

To be sure, Burris’ problems are overwhelming, and he’d do well to step down from the Senate seat he never should have agreed to accept in the first place. No doubt, it’s time for him to go.

But hearing Vitter complain about another senator’s ethical shortcomings is pretty amusing. It’s as if he has an incredibly short memory — or he assumes we do.

We are, after all, talking about a far-right Republican, known for his “family values” platform, who got caught up in a prostitution ring just two years ago. Vitter, who’s has spent years lecturing others about morality and the “sanctity of marriage,” arranged extra-marital liaisons while on the floor of Congress. The only reason Vitter wasn’t prosecuted is that the statute of limitations had come and gone.

I can appreciate the notion of Senate Republicans calling for Burris’ ouster. But if the caucus nominated Vitter to take the lead on this, they clearly chose the wrong guy.

Indeed, Vitter is facing a tough re-election fight next year. The more he talks about others’ ethical shortcomings, the easier it is to remind voters of his own unpleasant background with a certain D.C. madam.

Support Nonprofit Journalism

If you enjoyed this article, consider making a donation to help us produce more like it. The Washington Monthly was founded in 1969 to tell the stories of how government really works—and how to make it work better. Fifty years later, the need for incisive analysis and new, progressive policy ideas is clearer than ever. As a nonprofit, we rely on support from readers like you.

Yes, I’ll make a donation