Wednesday’s Mini-Report

WEDNESDAY’S MINI-REPORT…. Today’s edition of quick hits:

* It wasn’t at the top of the G20 agenda, but Obama and Medvedev made some very encouraging progress on a new nuclear arms treaty today.

* Instability in Iraq continues to be a cause for concern.

* The latest from the unresolved special election in New York’s 20th.

* Rush Limbaugh: if Gordon Brown keeps “slobbering” over Obama, he’ll “come down with anal poisoning and may die from it.” Classy bunch, those right-wing leaders.

* I liked DougJ’s description of the Republican budget plan: “This is just embarrassing. It’s like watching a Pauly Shore movie.”

* I’m still not sold on Obama’s gift-giving skills, but I think an iPod is better than a DVD collection.

* Thankfully, it wasn’t that bad, and the total was fairly modest, but still: “Kansas Gov. Kathleen Sebelius on Tuesday joined a list of cabinet nominees who were forced to pay back taxes because of errors in their returns.”

* Of course women in the military should have access to emergency contraception.

* Even as the economy crumbles, large cities are not seeing an increase in serious crimes.

* Sun-Times Media Group joins the Chapter 11 club.

* No one can tackle Glenn Beck’s sanity quite as well as Stephen Colbert.

* I’m glad to see some nominees in position to fill Treasury Department vacancies, but there are some serious questions about Neal Wolin that warrant answers.

* Is the birth-certificate obsession on the right nearly over?

* Do major news outlets understand what bankruptcy is? Perhaps not.

* Jim Henley didn’t mention me specifically, but I think I understand why he doesn’t read my blog.

* Happy Birthday, Rachel Maddow.

* If conservatives are going to bring in “Joe the Plumber” to rally opposition to EFCA, someone probably ought to tell the poor guy what EFCA is and why he doesn’t like it.

* One of the top stories on CNN.com this afternoon had this headline: “Ashton Kutcher squeals as chest is waxed.” I don’t think it was an April Fools’ joke; I think CNN considered this news.

* And finally, I figured former Bush national security adviser Stephen Hadley would wind up with a job somewhere, but I wouldn’t have guessed the U.S. Institute of Peace.

Anything to add? Consider this an open thread.

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