Tuesday’s campaign round-up

TUESDAY’S CAMPAIGN ROUND-UP….Today’s installment of campaign-related news items that wouldn’t generate a post of their own, but may be of interest to political observers.

* Rep. Carolyn Maloney’s (D) Senate campaign in New York ran into trouble yesterday when, in relaying a quote from someone else, she used the n-word. She later apologized: “It’s no excuse, but I was so caught up in relaying the story exactly as it was told to me that, in doing so, I repeated a word that should never be repeated.”

* Despite rumors to the contrary, former Florida state House Speaker Marco Rubio (R), at least for now, insists he will not end his Senate campaign. Rubio faces long odds in a Republican primary against Gov. Charlie Crist (R).

* Former New Hampshire Attorney General Kelly Ayotte (R) officially launched an “exploratory committee” for her Senate campaign yesterday.

* The DCCC outraised the NRCC in June, $7.15 million to $3.1 million. For the year to date, the DCCC leads, $30.84 million to $17.55 million.

* In the other chamber, the DSCC raised $6.2 million in June, as compared to the NRSC’s $3.4 million. The Dems’ Senate campaign committee, however, is carrying far more debt that its Republican counterpart.

* The latest Siena College Research Institute poll shows a slight uptick in New York Gov. David Paterson’s (D) public standing, but not enough to offer him serious hope. In the new survey, 36% of New Yorkers have a favorable view of Paterson, up from 27% in May. In a hypothetical primary match-up against New York State Attorney General Andrew Cuomo (D), Paterson still trails by 42 points.

* I don’t think Rep. Joe Sestak (D) cares one bit that Gov. Ed Rendell (D) doesn’t want him to run for the Senate.

* And in Michigan, the field of Republican gubernatorial hopefuls got a little more crowded yesterday when Rick Snyder, a former president of Gateway Computers, threw his hat into the ring. It will be Snyder’s first attempt at elected office.

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Steve Benen

Steve Benen is a producer at MSNBC's The Rachel Maddow Show. He was the principal contributor to the Washington Monthly's Political Animal blog from August 2008 until January 2012.