Monday’s Mini-Report

MONDAY’S MINI-REPORT…. Today’s edition of quick hits:

* Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, still not happy with Israel.

* Google gives up on China.

* President Obama will reportedly sign the first phase of health care reform into law tomorrow morning, around 11:15 a.m. (ET). He’ll also hit the road this week, appearing in Iowa City to help promote the new law.

* Leading far-right voices did not respond well to yesterday’s historic breakthrough.

* On a related note, Tea Party protestors not only threw around racist and anti-gay slurs, they also used offensive language towards at least one Hispanic lawmaker.

* Noting the outrageous conduct of the right-wing activists, Bill Bennett seems confused about what “racism” means, while a right-wing House member suggests conservative bigotry is Democrats’ fault.

* Sarabeth ponders the efficacy of Stupak’s strategizing.

* It was largely overshadowed by health care developments, but a huge crowd protested in support of immigration reform in D.C. yesterday. President Obama addressed the crowd via a videotaped message.

* As a national entity, ACORN is no more.

* Horse trading on student loan reform.

* Jane Mayer makes Marc Thiessen look even more ridiculous.

* Fact checking the Sunday shows.

* Sen. Judd Gregg (R-N.H.) is just not a serious person.

* I’m a big fan of Dave Weigel’s reporting, and I was delighted to learn today that he’s headed to the Washington Post. The Independent‘s loss is the Post‘s gain, and I wish him all the best in the new gig.

* Can we start helping Rush Limbaugh pack?

* And I feel a little awkward about mentioning this, but I wanted Andrew Sabl to know how much I appreciate his post about my health care-related efforts. His item means a great deal to me.

Anything to add? Consider this an open thread.

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