Monday’s campaign round-up

MONDAY’S CAMPAIGN ROUND-UP…. Today’s installment of campaign-related news items that wouldn’t generate a post of their own, but may be of interest to political observers.

* It took a little while, but former state Rep. Vic Rawl has conceded the South Carolina Senate Democratic primary to confused, unemployed newcomer Alvin Greene.

* It’s a Chamber of Commerce poll, so I can’t speak to its methodology, but in Florida, it shows Gov. Charlie Crist (I) expanding his lead in the Senate race, topping Marco Rubio (R) by double digits, 42% to 31%. Rep. Kendrick Meek (D) is third with 14%.

* On a related note, the same poll shows disgraced former health care executive Rick Scott leading state Attorney General Bill McCollum in the Republican gubernatorial primary, 35% to 30%.

* In Colorado, a new Denver Post poll shows Sen. Michael Bennet with a big lead over Andrew Romanoff in the Democratic Senate primary, 53% to 36%. Likewise, Ken Buck leads former Lt. Gov. Jane Norton in the Republican Senate primary, 53% to 37%. In a hypothetical match-up, Buck leads Bennet by three points, 46% to 43%.

* On a related note, the same poll also found former Rep. Scott McInnis (R) leading Denver Mayor John Hicklenlooper (D) in Colorado’s gubernatorial race, 47% to 43%.

* Utah’s Republican Senate primary is tomorrow, and a new Deseret News/KSL-TV poll shows Tim Bridgewater leading Mike Lee, 42% to 33%.

* Elsewhere in Utah, Rep. Jim Matheson (D) is facing a primary, in large part because he voted with Republicans on health care reform. The Deseret News poll shows him leading former schoolteacher Claudia Wright for the party nod, 52% to 33%.

* Brian Sandoval, the Republican gubernatorial nominee in Nevada, said he wasn’t recruited for the race. There’s ample evidence to the contrary.

* And Alabama Republicans can finally have their gubernatorial runoff, now that a recount found businessman Tim James came in third. James, son of former Gov. Fob James (R), spent $200,000 for the recount — and managed to lose a net total of 104 votes.

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