Tuesday’s campaign round-up

TUESDAY’S CAMPAIGN ROUND-UP…. Today’s installment of campaign-related news items that wouldn’t generate a post of their own, but may be of interest to political observers.

* Former Rep. Tom Tancredo (R) made it official yesterday afternoon, announcing that he’s running for governor in Colorado as a member of the extremist American Constitution Party. He has not, however, filed the paperwork with the Colorado secretary of state, nor has he registered as a member of his new party.

* Speaking of Colorado, it looks like Andrew Romanoff won’t be ending his primary challenge to Sen. Michael Bennet (D) anytime soon — the former state House Speaker sold his house so he could loan his campaign $325,000.

* In Wisconsin, right-wing businessman Ron Johnson (R), taking on Sen. Russ Feingold (D), recently disclosed that he owns as much as $315,000 in BP stock. On July 9, Johnson’s campaign said he would move the investments into a blind trust. Yesterday, the far-right candidate started backing away from his pledge.

* In Florida’s Senate Democratic primary, Rep. Kendrick Meek launched his first television ad of the year, going after billionaire Jeff Greene pretty aggressively.

* In Tennessee, the latest Mason-Dixon poll shows Knoxville Mayor Bill Haslam leading the Republican gubernatorial primary with 36% support. Rep. Zach Wamp, who recently raised the specter of seceding from the United States, is second in the poll with 25%. Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey, who doesn’t believe Islam is a religion, is third with 20%. The winner will likely face businessman Mike McWherter (D) in November.

* In Maryland’s gubernatorial rematch, a Gonzales Research poll shows Gov. Martin O’Malley (D) narrowly leading former Gov. Robert Ehrlich (R), 45% to 42%.

* It’s primary day in Oklahoma, where both parties are holding gubernatorial primaries. Rep. Mary Fallin (R) and state Attorney General Drew Edmondson (D) are expected to win their respective races.

* And let this be a lesson to party activists: if you’re going to remove your opponent’s campaign signs on public property, look for cameras that might catch you in the act.