Monday’s campaign round-up

MONDAY’S CAMPAIGN ROUND-UP…. Today’s installment of campaign-related news items that wouldn’t generate a post of their own, but may be of interest to political observers.

* With Florida’s high-profile primaries on deck for tomorrow, there’s a flurry of new data to consider. In the Republican gubernatorial primary, Mason-Dixon shows state Attorney General Bill McCollum out in front of Rick Scott by nine points (45% to 36%); Quinnipiac shows McCollum up by four points (39% to 35%); while Public Policy Polling shows Scott ahead by seven points (47% to 40%).

* As for the Sunshine State’s Democratic U.S. Senate primary, Mason-Dixon shows Rep. Kendrick Meek out in front of Jeff Greeene by 12 points (42% to 30%); Quinnipiac shows Meek up by 10 points (39% to 29%); while Public Policy Polling shows Meek ahead by 24 points (51% to 27%).

* Arizona will also hold its Republican U.S. Senate primary tomorrow, and while the race was at one time expected to be competitive, Sen. John McCain, after spending heavily, is now expected to easily dispatch former Rep. J.D. Hayworth.

* The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee’s priorities for the fall are beginning to take shape, with the DSCC “reserving millions of dollars in TV airtime during the month before the election in four competitive states.” On the list: Missouri and Kentucky (Republican pick-up opportunities), and Pennsylvania and Colorado (protecting Democratic seats).

* The U.S. Chamber of Commerce will practically be a third party this year, investing $75 million in the 2010 midterms. Nearly all, if not literally all, of the money will help conservative Republicans.

* The latest candidate to exploit 9/11 imagery for personal gain? New York gubernatorial hopeful Rick Lazio (R).

* The Senate race in the state of Washington is getting a little messy for Republicans, with Tea Party favorite Clint Didier refusing to endorse Dino Rossi in the wake of last week’s primary.

* Borrowing a page from his father’s playbook, Kentucky Senate hopeful Rand Paul (R) hosted a two-day “money bomb” last week. It didn’t go well — the campaign raised $258,000, far short of its $400,000-plus goal.