Tuesday’s campaign round-up

TUESDAY’S CAMPAIGN ROUND-UP…. Today’s installment of campaign-related news items that wouldn’t generate a post of their own, but may be of interest to political observers.

* An anonymous donor has donated $1 million to Tea Party Patriots to help with midterm election activities. Dave Weigel reports, “Local groups — 2,800 are eligible — will fill out grants and the money will head out the door by October 4.”

* Joe Miller, the extremist Republican nominee for Senate in Alaska, has railed against agriculture subsidies. He also received agriculture subsidies when he owned a farm in Kansas in the 1990s.

* In a poll likely to give many Senate Dems heart palpitations, a new Public Policy Polling survey John Raese (R) leading Gov. Joe Manchin (D) in West Virginia’s U.S. Senate race, 46% to 43%.

* The poll comes on the heels of Manchin picking up the support of the national and West Virginia Chamber of Commerce, which don’t usually think highly of Democrats.

* Despite scandals, incompetence, and misguided priorities, Sen. David Vitter (R) is cruising to re-election in Louisiana. The latest poll from Magellan Strategies shows him leading Rep. Charlie Melancon (D-LA) by 18 points, 52% to 34%.

* The latest DSCC ad is targeted far-right Senate hopeful Ken Buck (R) in Colorado, labeling the Republican “too extreme” for Colorado.

* Pennsylvania Attorney General Tom Corbett (R) appears to be pulling away in this year’s gubernatorial race, with a new Quinnipiac poll showing him up by 15 over Dan Onorato (D), 54% to 39%.

* Republicans have eyed legendary Rep. John Dingell (D-Mich.) as possibly being vulnerable this year, but a Detroit News poll shows the incumbent leading his GOP challenger by 19, 49.3% to 30.3%.

* Massachusetts’ gubernatorial race continues to be a competitive three-way contest. The latest Suffolk poll shows incumbent Gov. Deval Patrick (D) leading Charlie Baker (R) by seven, 41% to 34%. Independent Tim Cahill was third in the poll with 14%.

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