Quote of the Day

QUOTE OF THE DAY…. In some right-wing circles, the stiffest competition is the one to see who can hate the Affordable Care Act most. This week, it appears, Oregon congressional candidate and Tea Party favorite Scott Bruun (R) is out in front of the bizarre pack.

Reflecting on the ACA, Bruun told a group of voters a few days ago, “You know, when we look at this health care legislation, I would argue that from a fiscal perspective, it’s probably the worst piece of legislation this nation’s ever passed . From a social perspective, it’s right up there, I would argue — probably the fugitive slave law was worse — but still, the health care bill was pretty darned bad.”

It’s worth appreciating just how stark raving mad this is.

From a “fiscal perspective,” Bruun’s argument is absurd. According to the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office, the health care law reduces the deficit considerably over the next decade, and significantly more in the next decade. If we’re looking for the most fiscally irresponsible “piece of legislation this nation’s ever passed,” this wouldn’t even come close to making the list.

From a “social perspective,” Bruun is comfortable comparing the Affordable Care Act to the fugitive slave act?

Howard at The Commander Guy’s Post emails to remind me, “What the fugitive slave act did was to provide federal enforcement of the so-called property right of human bondage. The act gave slave catchers the right to kidnap and claim any African American residing in a free state.”

And as far as this congressional candidate is concerned, health care reform is “probably” better than the fugitive slave act.

This is the kind of policy analysis one might expect from an unhinged right-wing blogger, or a deranged radio-show host, but Scott Bruun is currently seeking federal office — and enjoys the enthusiastic support of his party, despite (because of?) his extremism.

Bruun will face freshman Rep. Kurt Schrader (D-Ore.) in November. Nate Silver considers it a competitive race, and lists Bruun as having a 47.1% chance of getting elected to Congress.