Another setback for Republicans’ minority outreach efforts

Larry Faircloth, a Republican gubernatorial candidate in West Virginia, decided he knew just how to connect with a local Tea Party organization — he’d call Nancy Pelosi a “bimbo” and President Obama a “Sambo.” (thanks to reader P.W.)

“Is she not one?” Faircloth said in a Tuesday evening telephone interview. “I mean, a lot of people think she is a bimbo; that’s why they replaced Congress with Republicans, and they removed her as speaker. I don’t find that as anything different than a political poke at her.”

He also referred to Obama as a “Sambo,” a term many consider racist.

“It was meant to be a joke, and if they took it different, I told the people there that I apologized,” Faircloth said.

He added, “We’ve been tiptoeing around the president.”

To their credit, the Tea Party activists who hosted the event asked Faircloth to make a public apology. He initially refused. Told he’d offended people, Faircloth reportedly added, “Well, they laughed.”

Faircloth later told reporters his remarks were an attempt to “bring a little humor” to the campaign, and he’s sorry “if I offended anybody.”

Racist, right-wing humor is just so droll, isn’t it?

He added a couple of days later, “There’s nothing racist or feminist about me,” which suggests Faircloth may not know what the words he’s saying actually mean.

Reiterating a question I asked a couple of weeks ago, after a GOP lawmaker in Oklahoma argued the state has a high African American population because blacks don’t work hard, where does the Republican Party even find people like this?

For what it’s worth, polls show Faircloth running a distant fourth in the GOP’s gubernatorial primary, suggesting he’s unlikely to be the state’s next governor.

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