From the weekend

We covered a fair amount of ground over the weekend. Here’s a quick overview of what you may have missed

On Sunday, we talked about:

* Mitt Romney’s campaign has a simple pitch: “I’m a successful businessman, I’ll create jobs and fix the economy.” There’s just one problem: after his experience with Bain Capital and in Massachusetts, Romney’s record on jobs is atrocious.

* An interesting new poll highlights candidate attributes Republican voters don’t like. Topping the list: adulterers, supporters of civil unions, former Obama administration officials, and Mormons. Huntsman and Gingrich are screwed.

* Arizona’s anti-immigrant law is awful. Alabama’s brand new anti-immigrant law is even worse.

* Fox Business’ Eric Bolling is engaging in the kind of over-the-top race-baiting that’s not only offensive, but rarely seen on national television.

* Rep. Anthony Weiner’s (D-N.Y.) problems intensity, as he enters a psychological treatment center.

And on Saturday, we talked about:

* It’s a problem that the Bush tax policy was a spectacular failure in every possible way. It’s a much bigger problem that Republicans refuse to learn from their mistakes.

* When it comes to dealing with Republican obstructionism in the Senate, the “nuclear option” has been taken off the table. Maybe it’s time to put it back.

* Kathleen Parker believes flip-flopping need not be considered a serious political sin. If only it were that simple.

* In “This Week in God,” we talked about, among other things, Herman Cain’s vision on loyalty tests for Muslim Americans who want to work in government.

* Tim Pawlenty wants to cut taxes by over $11 trillion. How would he pay for it? Since he believes in the Tax Fairy, Pawlenty doesn’t think he has to.

* The plot thickens with the McKinsey & Company “survey” on the Affordable Care Act. In this latest turn, it appears that the consulting firm abandoned its usual methodology for this one project, for reasons that remain unclear.

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