When Romney and Fischer share a stage

A week from today in DC, the religious right’s Values Voter Summit will kick off with an extraordinary guest list. Every Republican presidential candidate will be on hand, as will the House Republican leadership, and leading Fox News personalities, among many others.

This is to be expected. The Values Voter Summit is the year’s biggest gathering for social conservatives, and the GOP’s theocratic wing has enough foot soldiers to make a big difference in Republican politics.

There is, however, one pairing in particular that’s worth keeping an eye on. My friend Kyle Mantyla had this report yesterday.

[W]e are once again asking Republican leaders who will be attending the upcoming Values Voter Summit to denounce Bryan Fischer’s long history of unmitigated bigotry. This time we are focusing on Mitt Romney because, according to the conference schedule, he will be speaking immediately before Fischer on Saturday morning.

Our efforts in the past to get someone, anyone within the GOP or Religious Right to condemn Fischer’s relentless bigotry have not amounted to much, mainly because nobody within the movement seems to be particularly bothered by it, which is why GOP leaders continue to appear on his radio program and on stage with him at Religious Right events.

But we wonder if Mitt Romney might finally raise some objections to sharing the stage with someone who openly declared just earlier this week that the First Amendment does not apply to Mormons and asserts that the LDS church still supports polygamy.

This seems like a fair question, doesn’t it? I seem to recall, in 2008, the right took a pretty strong interest in whom Democratic presidential candidates chose to associate themselves with.

And in this case, Mitt Romney will be sharing the stage with a loony, radical bigot who doesn’t even believe the First Amendment applies to Mormons — and Romney’s a Mormon.

Maybe some enterprising campaign reporter covering Romney can ask whether Fischer belongs on the Values Voter Summit stage, and whether Romney feels comfortable serving as Fischer’s opening act.