Bunny Ears And Real Americans

Bunny Ears And Real Americans

Bill Sali, one of my favorite nutty Congresspeople, makes the news again:

“Congressman Bill Sali and his campaign staff disrupted a NewsChannel 7 reporter and a representative for his opponent during an interview Tuesday in Downtown Boise.

KTVB reporter Ysabel Bilbao was interviewing Walt Minnick’s campaign director John Foster Wednesday afternoon. During the interview, someone loudly yelled and was laughing during the interview at the Grove plaza.

Bilbao and Foster initially ignored the intrusion, but quickly noticed the source of the heckling — Sali and members of his staff. (…)

Foster said he saw Sali making faces at him and holding up “bunny ears.””

Bill Sali is the Republican Congressman from Idaho who once said:

“Forty percent of the mass of every tree in the forest is crude oil,” he said. Going after that, he said, “could put Idaho in the oil business for the first time.”

Crude oil. From trees. Take that, Saudi Arabia!

He’s also personally charming:

“His confrontational style alienates even fellow Republican legislators. During the 2006 session, he angered Democrats so much during a debate about abortion that they walked out. Afterward, Newcomb said: “That idiot (Sali) is just an absolute idiot. He doesn’t have one ounce of empathy in his whole fricking body. And you can put that in the paper.”(…) But that isn’t all. When Republican Congressman Mike Simpson was speaker of the Idaho House, he once threatened to throw Sali out of a window in the state Capitol.”

Still, I’ll take bunny ears and arboreal crude over Rep. Robin Hayes’ claim that “liberals hate real Americans that work and achieve and believe in God.”

I wonder: when, exactly, did I become a synthetic American?

Washington Monthly - Donate today and your gift will be doubled!

Support Nonprofit Journalism

If you enjoyed this article, consider making a donation to help us produce more like it. The Washington Monthly was founded in 1969 to tell the stories of how government really works—and how to make it work better. Fifty years later, the need for incisive analysis and new, progressive policy ideas is clearer than ever. As a nonprofit, we rely on support from readers like you.

Yes, I’ll make a donation