Tuesday’s campaign round-up

TUESDAY’S CAMPAIGN ROUND-UP….Today’s installment of campaign-related news items that wouldn’t generate a post of their own, but may be of interest to political observers.

* Sen. Roland Burris (D-Ill.) doesn’t want to resign, but is reportedly prepared to say he won’t run again in 2010.

* Norm Coleman’s lawyers signaled they could wrap up the current phase of their ongoing lawsuit this week. (This would not include the appeal, of course.) In the meantime, Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty (R) believes the lack of representation in the Senate is hurting the state.

* The DCCC’s Frontline program, designed to bolster at-risk incumbents, identified its 40 most vulnerable freshmen yesterday.

* Americans United for Change’s Brad Woodhouse is leaving the organization to take over as communications and research director at the Democratic National Committee.

* Texas Gov. Rick Perry (R) is gearing up for a primary challenge from Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison (R), and right now, he’s losing. A PPP survey shows Hutchison leading Perry, 56% to 31%, among Texas Republicans.

* Former President Bill Clinton will headline a fundraiser for Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) next month in NYC.

* Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman Jr. (R) said yesterday he doesn’t bother to deal with congressional leaders from his own party. “I don’t even know the congressional leadership,” Huntsman told the Washington Times. “I have not met them. I don’t listen or read whatever it is they say because it is inconsequential — completely.”

* With the DCCC targeting 12 House Republicans who voted against the stimulus package, Mitt Romney’s political action committee is sending $1,000 checks to each of the dozen GOP lawmakers. Romney, who is almost certainly planning another presidential run, praised the Republicans for “standing up for fiscal responsibility.”

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