Wednesday’s campaign round-up

WEDNESDAY’S CAMPAIGN ROUND-UP…. Today’s installment of campaign-related news items that wouldn’t generate a post of their own, but may be of interest to political observers.

* In the wake of health care reform passing, the Democratic National Committee raised $2 million in two days — without actually making a formal fundraising appeal.

* In Ohio’s closely watched gubernatorial campaign, Public Policy Polling now shows former congressman and Fox News personality John Kasich (R) leading incumbent Gov. Ted Strickland (D), 42% to 37%.

* Hoping to shake up the Republican primary in Kentucky’s Senate race, Dick Cheney has announced his support for Kentucky Secretary of State Trey Grayson. Most recent polls show Grayson trailing right-wing ophthalmologist Rand Paul.

* As Utah Republicans gather for local caucuses, Sen. Bob Bennett’s (R) future may be in jeopardy.

* In Vermont’s open gubernatorial race, Rasmussen shows Lt. Gov. Brian Dubie (R) leading all of his would-be Democratic challengers in hypothetical match-ups. There are currently five top-tier Democrats vying for the party’s nomination, and Vermont Secretary of State Deb Markowitz (D) is the most competitive against Dubie according to the poll.

* Rep. Bart Stupak (D-Mich.) ended up voting for health care reform over the weekend, but his primary challenger, former Charlevoix County Commissioner Connie Saltonstall, intends to continue with her campaign.

* Rep. Brad Ellsworth’s (D) Senate campaign in Indiana will get a boost of $1 million from retiring Sen. Evan Bayh’s (D) coffers.

* And in Georgia, Gov. Sonny Perdue (R) announced that the special election to replace Rep. Nathan Deal (R), who resigned to run for Perdue’s job, will be April 27. Republicans are widely expected to keep the seat in GOP hands.

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